Volume 4, Issue 5-1, October 2015, Page: 1-6
Decomposition of Bamboo Powder for Eco-Friendly Material Development by Using Superheated Steams
Sayaka Ikeno, Graduate School of Systems Engineering, Okayama Prefectural University, Okayama, Japan
Kiyotaka Obunai, Department of Systems Engineering, Okayama Prefectural University, Okayama, Japan
Tadao Fukuta, Department of Systems Engineering, Okayama Prefectural University, Okayama, Japan
Koichi Ozaki, Department of Systems Engineering, Okayama Prefectural University, Okayama, Japan
Received: Apr. 29, 2015;       Accepted: May 8, 2015;       Published: Jun. 9, 2015
DOI: 10.11648/j.am.s.2015040501.11      View  4616      Downloads  103
Abstract
The purpose of this study is to investigate an alternative method to decompose bamboo for the development of new eco-friendly materials. The effect of superheated steam treatment on the chemistry of decomposed bamboo biomass was investigated; the composition of the decomposed biomass was quantitatively determined, and its molecular structures were also evaluated by IR spectroscopy. The ability of the decomposed bamboo biomass to be molded without the use of binders was also investigated, and the mechanical properties of the molded samples were investigated by a dynamic hardness test. The raw material, consisting of bamboo powder and pure water were put into the reactor and sealed tightly. To decompose the raw material, the temperature of reactor was elevated by the ring furnace to a specified level and maintained for 10 min. After the decomposition, three types of determinations, holocellulose, α-cellulose, and lignin determination were performed for quantitative evaluation. The IR spectrum of decomposed bamboo powder was also measured by using FT-IR to evaluate the molecular structure. For investigate the ability of the decomposed bamboo powder to be molded without the use of a binder, the compression molding technique was employed. The young’s modulus of molded products was measured by using dynamic hardness tester. Quantitatively determination results revealed that, when the superheated vapor treatment was conducted in the temperature range from 200 to 220°C, a solid residue containing mostly α-cellulose and lignin was obtained. IR spectrum evaluation revealed that the cellulose was decomposed by the superheated steam at 200 °C and above. The young’s modulus of compression molding products also revealed that the lignin contained in the decomposed bamboo powder improved the thermosetting ability after the superheated water vapor treatment. These results suggested that the superheated steam treatment was effective to obtain the decomposed bamboo for the development of new eco-friendly materials.
Keywords
Bamboo, Decomposition, Superheated Steam, Compression Molding
To cite this article
Sayaka Ikeno, Kiyotaka Obunai, Tadao Fukuta, Koichi Ozaki, Decomposition of Bamboo Powder for Eco-Friendly Material Development by Using Superheated Steams, Advances in Materials. Special Issue:New Methods of Extraction and Characterization of Plant Fibers. Vol. 4, No. 5-1, 2015, pp. 1-6. doi: 10.11648/j.am.s.2015040501.11
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